64’ Troller Fishing Schooner

   
  • Vessel Specifications and Comments

    • LOD: 64' 0"
    • LWL: ' 0"
    • Beam: "
    • Draft:
    • Displacement: lbs
    • Ballast: lbs
    • Sail Area: sq.ft.
    • Power:
    • Construction:
    • General Comments: My first thought was the 60’ forward wheelhouse boat.  This arrangement has a number of advantages, the hold is aft close to the fishing action and all in one piece (not divided as with the aft “schooner” style house), the working area is sheltered by the deckhouse forward, and the accommodation is all connected together.  The downside is lots of windage forward and you can’t see the hauling station clearly from the pilothouse (it’s aft of PH). More

About the Plans

    • Construction Method and Materials:

      Steel. Transverse web frame (angles) and flat bar stringers, deep plate floors with integral tanks.
    • Number and Type of Drawings:

      Drawings are CAD, Lines, general construction, sail and rigging plan, general arrangement. Full size part plots available at extra cost.
    • Study Plan:

      General Arrangement PDF
    • Study Plan:

      Sail Plan PDF
    • Design Comments:

      Design Comments
    • Base Price:

      $2500 CAD

Comments

These concepts originated from a conversation on Boatdesign.net concerning the premise of a sail assisted tuna troller/longliner.  The prospective owner/builder was thinking about the optimum size and carrying capacity of a boat able to make some headway under sail and fish well offshore for a month or six weeks at a time.  All catch would be fresh frozen at sea.    

My first thought was the 60’ forward wheelhouse boat.  This arrangement has a number of advantages, the hold is aft close to the fishing action and all in one piece (not divided as with the aft “schooner” style house), the working area is sheltered by the deckhouse forward, and the accommodation is all connected together.  The downside is lots of windage forward and you can’t see the hauling station clearly from the pilothouse (it’s aft of PH).  

The second concept is the 60’ house aft, midships hold, “schooner” style boat.  This boat carries her payload more centered, but it’s hard to get fish from the stern forward when trolling, though there’s no problem when longlining.  Accommodation is divided between the deckhouse and the foc’sl, which may be a plus on long trips! Both these shorter boats have a beam of 20’, the classic 3:1 length/beam ratio, which is great for carrying capacity and stability, but perhaps a bit blunt for optimum comfort in a seaway and low resistance needed when sailing.  

The 80’ three -master has a beam of only 18’, she’s narrower and longer than the earlier concepts.  This will be a very comfortable boat at sea, and she’ll run at good speed with low power.  The rig is kept short using multiple masts and sails to add versatility and reduce the worry of giant sails causing problems.  Mostly sails will be raised or lowered, never reefed except in extreme conditions.  This long boat has space for two large holds again to increase versatility in balancing the load.  The engine room is midships with tanks either side and in the keel.  

Tad Roberts